A ’49 Merc World’s Famous Poem

A ’49 Merc World’s Famous Poem

Someone dumped it here one night, locked
the wheel and watched it tumble into goldenrod and tansy,
ragweed grown over one door flung outward
in disgust. They did a good job, too: fenders split, windshield
veined with an intricate pattern of cracks
and fretwork. They felt, perhaps, a rare satisfaction
as the chassis crunched against rock and the rear window
buckled with its small view of the past. But the tires
are gone, and a shattered tail light shields a swarm
of hornets making home of the wreckage. How much
is enough? Years add up, placing one small burden on another
until the back yaws, shoulders slump. Whoever it was
stood here as the hood plunged over and some branches snapped,
a smell of gasoline suffusing the air, reminding us,
of the exact moment of capitulation when the life,
we planned can no longer be pinpointed on any map
and the way we had of getting there knocks and rattles to a halt
above a dark ravine and we go off relieved—
no, happy to be rid of the weight of all that effort and desire.

Kurt Brown
from More Things in Heaven and Earth

A ’49 Merc World’s Famous Poem

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