William Shakespeare Poem

10 Super Motivational William Shakespeare Poem

William Shakespeare Poem! Here is the list of 10 most powerful and popular poems of William Shakespeare.

Who was William Shakespeare,

While William Shakespeare’s popularity is primarily based exceptionally on his plays, he grew to be famous first as a poet. With the partial exception of the Sonnets (1609), quarried because the early nineteenth century for autobiographical secrets and techniques allegedly encoded in them, the nondramatic writings have historically been pushed to the margins of the Shakespeare industry. Yet the learn about of his nondramatic poetry can illuminate Shakespeare’s things to do as a poet emphatically of his very own age, specially in the length of excellent literary ferment in the final ten or twelve years of the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Shakespeare’s specific delivery date stays unknown. He used to be baptized in Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon on April 26, 1564, his mother’s 0.33 child, however the first to live on infancy. This has led students to conjecture that he was once born on April 23rd, given the era’s conference of baptizing newborns on their 0.33 day. Shakespeare’s father, John Shakespeare, moved to Stratford in about 1552 and unexpectedly grew to become a distinguished discern in the town’s commercial enterprise and politics. He rose to be bailiff, the easiest legitimate in the town, however then in about 1575-1576 his prosperity declined markedly and he withdrew from public life. In 1596, thanks to his son’s success and persistence, he used to be granted a coat of fingers with the aid of the College of Arms, and the household moved into New Place, the grandest residence in Stratford.

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10 Super Motivational William Shakespeare Poem

1. “It Was A Lover” William Shakespeare Poem

It was a lover and his lass,
   With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
That o’er the green cornfield did pass,
   In springtime, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring.
Between the acres of the rye,
   With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
Those pretty country folks would lie,
   In springtime, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring.
This carol they began that hour,
   With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
How that a life was but a flower
   In springtime, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring.
And therefore take the present time,
   With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
For love is crownèd with the prime
   In springtime, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding, ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring.

2. Full fathom five thy father lies William Shakespeare Poem

Full fathom five thy father lies;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes:
Nothing of him that doth fade,
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell:
                                             Ding-dong.
Hark! now I hear them,—ding-dong, bell.

3. O Mistress mine where are you roaming? William Shakespeare Poem

O Mistress mine where are you roaming?
O stay and hear, your true love’s coming,
      That can sing both high and low.
Trip no further pretty sweeting.
Journeys end in lovers’ meeting,
      Every wise man’s son doth know.
What is love, ’tis not hereafter,
Present mirth, hath present laughter:
      What’s to come, is still unsure.
In delay there lies no plenty,
Then come kiss me sweet and twenty:
      Youth’s a stuff will not endure.

4. Double, double toil and trouble William Shakespeare Poem

Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the caldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
Adder’s fork and blind-worm’s sting,
Lizard’s leg and howlet’s wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
Double, double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and caldron bubble.
Cool it with a baboon’s blood,
Then the charm is firm and good.

5. Orpheus with his lute made trees William Shakespeare Poem

Orpheus with his lute made trees,
And the mountain tops that freeze,
Bow themselves when he did sing:
To his music plants and flowers
Ever sprung; as sun and showers
There had made a lasting spring.
Every thing that heard him play,
Even the billows of the sea,
Hung their heads, and then lay by.
In sweet music is such art,
Killing care and grief of heart
Fall asleep, or hearing, die.

6. Under the greenwood tree William Shakespeare Poem

Under the greenwood tree
Who loves to lie with me,
And turn his merry note
Unto the sweet bird’s throat,
Come hither, come hither, come hither:
            Here shall he see
            No enemy
But winter and rough weather.
Who doth ambition shun
And loves to live i’ the sun,
Seeking the food he eats,
And pleased with what he gets,
Come hither, come hither, come hither:
            Here shall he see
            No enemy
But winter and rough weather.

7. Take, oh take those lips away William Shakespeare Poem

Take, oh take those lips away,
      That so sweetly were forsworn,
And those eyes: the breake of day,
      Lights that do mislead the Morn;
But my kisses bring again, bring again,
Seals of love, but sealed in vain, sealed in vain.

8. Where the bee sucks, there suck I” William Shakespeare Poem

Where the bee sucks, there suck I:
In a cowslip’s bell I lie;
There I couch when owls do cry.
On the bat’s back I do fly
After summer merrily.
Merrily, merrily shall I live now
Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.

9. Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all William Shakespeare Poem

Take all my loves, my love, yea, take them all:
What hast thou then more than thou hadst before?
No love, my love, that thou mayst true love call—
All mine was thine before thou hadst this more.
Then if for my love thou my love receivest,
I cannot blame thee for my love thou usest;
But yet be blamed if thou this self deceivest
By wilful taste of what thyself refusest.
I do forgive thy robb’ry, gentle thief,
Although thou steal thee all my poverty;
And yet love knows it is a greater grief
To bear love’s wrong than hate’s known injury.
    Lascivious grace, in whom all ill well shows,
    Kill me with spites, yet we must not be foes.

10. Alas, ’tis true I have gone here and there William Shakespeare Poem

Alas, ’tis true I have gone here and there
And made myself a motley to the view,
Gor’d mine own thoughts, sold cheap what is most dear,
Made old offences of affections new.
Most true it is that I have look’d on truth
Askance and strangely: but, by all above,
These blenches gave my heart another youth,
And worse essays prov’d thee my best of love.
Now all is done, have what shall have no end!
Mine appetite, I never more will grind
On newer proof, to try an older friend,
A god in love, to whom I am confin’d.
Then give me welcome, next my heaven the best,
Even to thy pure and most most loving breast.

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